sara-meow:

I like stripey socks

sara-meow:

I like stripey socks

tinyneedleteeth:

accioguitardis:

cyberunfamous:

trillow:

how much do islands cost i want one

Less than a college education

image

what the fuck

FRIENDS LET’S BUY AN ISLAND TOGETHER AND BUILD OUR OWN SOCIETY!

54 Acres is gods plenty for like 4 or 5 people. Like, holy crap. And then we’re only having to pay approx $4541 because I’m not so good with the math.

THINK OF THE POSSIBILITIES

theolduvaigorge:

CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds [with appalling video footage]
by  Esther Bergdahl
“How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare? About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro.
Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There’s not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in. Because if there’s anything Americans are good at, it’s finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.
You’ve got to watch this and see for yourself how bad it gets. Just when you think the segment has peaked, it expands the scope of its awfulness. Not just satisfied with comparing the traditional dances of Maori warriors (including those who welcomed former first lady Laura Bush during a visit to soldiers in Afghanistan) to Chippendales and horny emus, Moos gleefully highlights diplomats and world leaders “going native.”
Yeah, she actually said that.
So, how long does it take for CNN to transform into your weird, clueless right-wing relative who’s just discovered chain emails? About two minutes, it looks like. And if you need more, you’re in luck: CNN has a playlist available for your delectation called “The Wacky World of Jeanne Moos.”
***”Can you image people being active participants in their own cultures in their own lands? How utterly barbaric!”  -British Colonialism (representing cultural and literal genocide, rape, economic exploitation and theft since the 15th century)
****And its bastard offspring the American CNN reporter.
(Source: PolicyMic via @MarcKissel on Twitter)

theolduvaigorge:

CNN Turns a Boring Royal Visit Into a Racist Nightmare in Just 13 Seconds [with appalling video footage]

  • by  Esther Bergdahl

How long does it take for the most trusted news source to turn a boring non-story into a racist, xenophobic nightmare? About 13 seconds it turns out, and that’s only because CNN news correspondent Jeanne Moos takes her time narrating the intro.

Earlier this month, Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and chubby-cheeked baby George took their first visit overseas. There’s not much to say about royal trips abroad, aside from cute playdate photos with the commoners, but CNN, bless their hearts, found a way to make us sit up and wonder what century they belong in. Because if there’s anything Americans are good at, it’s finding new and horrible ways to make honoring indigenous traditions and experiencing other cultures about weird dances, things that baffle white people and butts.

You’ve got to watch this and see for yourself how bad it gets. Just when you think the segment has peaked, it expands the scope of its awfulness. Not just satisfied with comparing the traditional dances of Maori warriors (including those who welcomed former first lady Laura Bush during a visit to soldiers in Afghanistan) to Chippendales and horny emus, Moos gleefully highlights diplomats and world leaders “going native.”

Yeah, she actually said that.

So, how long does it take for CNN to transform into your weird, clueless right-wing relative who’s just discovered chain emails? About two minutes, it looks like. And if you need more, you’re in luck: CNN has a playlist available for your delectation called “The Wacky World of Jeanne Moos.”

***”Can you image people being active participants in their own cultures in their own lands? How utterly barbaric!”  -British Colonialism (representing cultural and literal genocide, rape, economic exploitation and theft since the 15th century)

****And its bastard offspring the American CNN reporter.

(Source: PolicyMic via @MarcKissel on Twitter)

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.